Tag Archives: consumer-drive decisions in supermarkets

Different Grocers Top Different Lists!

A recent Reuters article focused on “low cost” grocery leaders, noting that the German grocery chain Aldi Inc is trying to outdo the world’s biggest retailer (Walmart).

Aldi currently boasts 1,600 U.S. stores, but only accounts for about 1.5 % of the U.S. market.  A company spokesperson referenced in the article says Aldi is growing at 15% per year and plans to open 400 new locations by the end of next year; he also said Aldi’s prices are 21 % lower than its lowest-priced competitors.

Walmart, on the other hand, currently controls about 22 % of the market and its U.S. sales are estimated to grow about 2 % this year, according to analysts; and, of course, Amazon continues to grow Amazon Fresh while feverishly testing brick-and-mortar stores.

At the same time, in a race based on customer satisfaction and shopping experience, MediaPost reported the results of a Top Grocer’s survey done by Market Force, a market research company based in Louisville, Colorado. Their customer loyalty index is based on responses from some 12,700 consumers, the article said, and the top slots were awarded to:

  1. Wegmans and Publix (tie for 1st)
  2. Trader Joe’s
  3. H.E.B.

Ironically, Walmart came in last in the Market Force survey… which makes one realize that price does not necessarily guarantee customer loyalty.

Insight Into Shelf-side Decision Making?

A recent article published by advancingretail.org shared some interesting information about understanding shopper behavior at the shelf.

“Understanding true shopper behavior in the store has become the latest battlefield in the fast moving consumer goods industry,” the article states.

Citing studies that show an estimated 76% of purchase decisions are made in the store, the article goes on to suggest that adding even a single product to a small percentage of shopping trips could equate to significant increases in sales revenue.

Wondering if there’s a way to accomplish this?

According to the article, Shopperception, a company with locations in Delaware and Buenos Aires, offers a platform that is able to “digitize shopper behavior in much the same way marketers are able to understand shoppers’ behavior online.”

Apparently their platform uses three-dimensional sensors combined with sophisticated algorithms to generate the data.

Assuming the decision-making that will be based on the consumer preferences translated by this data is combined with high levels of customer service, could this be a win-win opportunity for shoppers and supermarkets alike?